Our Namesake

On June 7, 1892, Homer Adolf Plessy Purchased A First Class Railroad Ticket, Boarded The Train, And Was Arrested Two Blocks Later At The Corner Of Press And Royal Streets. He Was Charged With Violating The Separate Car Act, Which Mandated Separate Accommodations For Black And White Railroad Passengers.

HOMER PLESSY WAS SPECIAL BECAUSE HE RISKED HIS LIFE FOR THE SAKE OF HIS PEOPLE. HE EVEN WENT TO JAIL FOR HIS BELIEF IN EQUAL RIGHTS.  --WOLFGANG, 3RD GRADE

HOMER PLESSY WAS SPECIAL BECAUSE HE RISKED HIS LIFE FOR THE SAKE OF HIS PEOPLE. HE EVEN WENT TO JAIL FOR HIS BELIEF IN EQUAL RIGHTS.  --WOLFGANG, 3RD GRADE

The result was the landmark Plessy v Ferguson Supreme Court case, which made “Separate but Equal” the law of the land until the ruling was overturned with Brown v Board of Education in 1954.

We draw inspiration every day from Homer Plessy and the Citizens’ Committee — for their bravery, their ingenuity, their sense of community, and their commitment to justice

This seemingly simple act was in fact the result of meticulous planning by a group called the Citizens’ Committee. Their creative and highly sophisticated work was designed with a Supreme Court challenge in mind, intending to stem the tide of segregation that was taking over post-Reconstruction America.

 

History of the School

Back in 2009, a community of educators, families and advocates began to come together around a simple idea: we saw a need for an excellent elementary school in downtown New Orleans. Through door-to-door campaigns, and hundreds of small-group meetings in homes and church halls, a vision came together of a school that placed that a high value on critical thinking, creativity, diversity and citizenship. Today that is the Homer A. Plessy Community School.

In 2012, the Plessy School’s Type 1 Charter Application was approved by the Orleans Parish School board. Plessy opened its doors in the fall of 2013, serving children in grades Pre-K-2 with an arts-integrated, project-based curriculum. The school will grow by one grade level each year to serve children in grades Pre-K through 8.

The 2017-18 school year will welcome a new chapter for Plessy School.  The campus will move to its new location in the French Quarter at the former Mc15 buiding, also known as the Little Red Schoolhouse.  The building has a colorful past.  It was constructed in 1932 by city architect, E. Christy on the site of the early 19th century St. Philip Theatre.  Richard Simmons was a graduate of Mc15 and the Elvis Presley movie, King Creole, was filmed in it.  We are very proud to return the school to its original Arts-Integrated roots and are thrilled to call it home!

Plessy School calls itself a community school but it could even more accurately be called a family school. Every member of the Plessy family is highly valued, and together we work to provide a top quality education for all of our young people.